Podcast on Roman History - Episode I Founding Rome (Earn Denarii!)

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Re: Podcast on Roman History - Episode I Founding Rome (Earn Denarii!)

Postby Lucius Curtius Philo » Mon Oct 10, 2016 10:06 pm

Gaia Cassia Longina wrote:I also want to talk about are the gods.

The gods are not "Greek." The Roman gods came from the same Indo-European migration as the Greeks. For example, the Greek gods are malevolent (most of the time) and the Roman gods are not (take for example, Zeus and Jupiter). Another example is the native Italian and local god, Liber, who is not the equivalent of Dionysus/Bacchus but is a wholly Italian god. Also -- the Etruscan, Sabine gods, and all the other local populations!

The Roman-Italian gods are hard to differentiate because they adopted their Greek stories, myths, and sometimes representations, but this should not be confused with "stealing the Greek gods." (:



Salve Cassia,

Correct. This is one of the most commonly made errors. The Greek and Roman Gods share a common Indo-European root. But the Latins did not simply adopt Greek Gods. They shared Gods through a common origin. Later increasing Greek colonization of the Italian peninsula led to some Greek traditions being applied to these Gods. Other traditions, especially from the Etruscans were also adopted.

This is important as it shows an essential characteristic of the Roman religion. It always adopted traditions and ideas into its own unique framework. Romans took ideas from all over and created their own unique Roman blend of traditions. All of this was built upon a common Indo-European foundation.

vale.

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Re: Podcast on Roman History - Episode I Founding Rome (Earn Denarii!)

Postby Tiberius Publicius Gracchus » Tue Oct 11, 2016 9:18 pm

According to the myth, Evander founded a city called Pallantium at the future site of Rome. Perhaps this city was eventually merged into the city that Romulus founded?
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Re: Podcast on Roman History - Episode I Founding Rome (Earn Denarii!)

Postby Caeso Cispius Laevus » Fri Oct 14, 2016 4:15 am

Quintus Furius Camillus wrote:SALVETE!

Very good idea Laevus. I look forward to more discussions based on your podcast.

As for the discussion. We know from the evidence that a settlement in the location of Rome existed long before Rome was said to be founded. I believe on the various hills of what would become Rome various district Latin communities existed. Evidence strongly suggests this. These communities probably were linked loosely by marriage and family ties. I also imagine they squabbled frequently for control of trade across and on the Tiber.

We also know from the archeological evidence that from around the time Romulus is said to have existed the population of the seven hills increased. We also know that these distinct hill communities became more unified.

Like many things from the fog of pre-history, real events take on a mythological tone over time. I do believe a man existed who achieved great things and power over this period. This man was probably backed up by many other prominent men and supporters. Probably the leading figures of one or more of the hill communities. These men formed the first "court" or senate of a unified entity. The evidence would suggest some sort of unification of the various communities occurred over this time. I think this process is what became known as the founding of Rome. I also would not be surprised if one of the larger Latin communities at the time, such as Alba Longa, where Romulus is said to born conquered the Roman hill communities and this led to unification by the sword and by a foreign power. Lots of similar events were common at this time. I also think it would be plausible that such a unified community now controlled by a newly empowered "foreign" general could decide to turn around and conquer his home town of Alba Longa. This could be the historical origin for Romulus' struggle with his uncle, King Amulius. I do believe these two Latin communities likely had a conflict. Small scale warfare led by warlords was a yearly occurrence during this period. This could also account for the mythology of Rome being made up of rebels.

The death or disappearance of Romulus is also interesting. He is said to have ascended into the heavens or simply disappeared during a gathering of the Senate. There is a compelling scholarly theory that Romulus met the same fate as Caesar. I would not be surprised if Romulus, or the strongman, and likely foreigner who unified the hills was killed by the leading men of his court because of some now forgotten power struggle. This could account for why the second king, Numa, was selected by the senate and why he was said to be of Sabine origin. The mythology of Numa being very different from warlike Romulus could also suggest the resolution of a power struggle that cumulated in the death of Romulus and the appointment of the second king.

VALETE!


Sal.

Thoughtful commentary my friend. I could see the actual events being similar to those you describe. Of course, we will never know for sure unless new evidence comes to light. But your comment demonstrates how legend has kernels of truth embedded within the distorted historical commentary. Our evidence both in Roman history and in the study of other cultures reaffirms this idea.

I have decided to select this post for the X denarii award. Well done Camillus.

We have moved on to the second podcast here: viewtopic.php?f=31&t=1156

Please feel free to continue this discussion and to proceed to the next episode where X more denaii are being offered!
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Re: Podcast on Roman History - Episode I Founding Rome (Earn Denarii!)

Postby Quintus Furius Camillus » Thu Oct 27, 2016 7:10 am

Caeso Cispius Laevus wrote:
Quintus Furius Camillus wrote:SALVETE!

Very good idea Laevus. I look forward to more discussions based on your podcast.

As for the discussion. We know from the evidence that a settlement in the location of Rome existed long before Rome was said to be founded. I believe on the various hills of what would become Rome various district Latin communities existed. Evidence strongly suggests this. These communities probably were linked loosely by marriage and family ties. I also imagine they squabbled frequently for control of trade across and on the Tiber.

We also know from the archeological evidence that from around the time Romulus is said to have existed the population of the seven hills increased. We also know that these distinct hill communities became more unified.

Like many things from the fog of pre-history, real events take on a mythological tone over time. I do believe a man existed who achieved great things and power over this period. This man was probably backed up by many other prominent men and supporters. Probably the leading figures of one or more of the hill communities. These men formed the first "court" or senate of a unified entity. The evidence would suggest some sort of unification of the various communities occurred over this time. I think this process is what became known as the founding of Rome. I also would not be surprised if one of the larger Latin communities at the time, such as Alba Longa, where Romulus is said to born conquered the Roman hill communities and this led to unification by the sword and by a foreign power. Lots of similar events were common at this time. I also think it would be plausible that such a unified community now controlled by a newly empowered "foreign" general could decide to turn around and conquer his home town of Alba Longa. This could be the historical origin for Romulus' struggle with his uncle, King Amulius. I do believe these two Latin communities likely had a conflict. Small scale warfare led by warlords was a yearly occurrence during this period. This could also account for the mythology of Rome being made up of rebels.

The death or disappearance of Romulus is also interesting. He is said to have ascended into the heavens or simply disappeared during a gathering of the Senate. There is a compelling scholarly theory that Romulus met the same fate as Caesar. I would not be surprised if Romulus, or the strongman, and likely foreigner who unified the hills was killed by the leading men of his court because of some now forgotten power struggle. This could account for why the second king, Numa, was selected by the senate and why he was said to be of Sabine origin. The mythology of Numa being very different from warlike Romulus could also suggest the resolution of a power struggle that cumulated in the death of Romulus and the appointment of the second king.

VALETE!


Sal.

Thoughtful commentary my friend. I could see the actual events being similar to those you describe. Of course, we will never know for sure unless new evidence comes to light. But your comment demonstrates how legend has kernels of truth embedded within the distorted historical commentary. Our evidence both in Roman history and in the study of other cultures reaffirms this idea.

I have decided to select this post for the X denarii award. Well done Camillus.

We have moved on to the second podcast here: viewtopic.php?f=31&t=1156

Please feel free to continue this discussion and to proceed to the next episode where X more denaii are being offered!




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