Guide to Terms and Abbreviations

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Guide to Terms and Abbreviations

Postby Gaius Curtius Philo » Sun Sep 11, 2016 5:55 pm

Salvete Cives!

I'm going to try and explain some terms out to you guys so that we are all on the same page here. So, without further ado:

Abbreviations


Terms

This is all for now, but I will expand this list as words and phrases occur to me. If anyone has any question needing answer, please tell me.
"Ignis aurum probat" - Seneca
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Re: Guide to Terms and Abbreviations

Postby Titus Papirius Carbo » Mon Sep 12, 2016 10:24 pm

[Sender] [Receiver] Sal. - Sender says Greetings to Receiver.
[Sender] [Receiver] S.P.D. Sender says many greetings to Receiver.


T. Papirius C. Aurelio sal.

Forgive me if I am mistaken, but I believe that the [Receiver] needs to be in the dative case(-ae for feminine and -o for masculine). And that the [Sender] [Receiver] Sal. is short for [Sender] [Receiver] salutem dicit.

Vale.

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Re: Guide to Terms and Abbreviations

Postby Lucius Aurelius Curio » Mon Sep 12, 2016 11:37 pm

You are most likely correct in that. However, this guide was simplified for those not versed in Latin.
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Re: Guide to Terms and Abbreviations

Postby Gaius Curtius Philo » Tue Sep 13, 2016 12:05 am

Titus Papirius Carbo wrote:
[Sender] [Receiver] Sal. - Sender says Greetings to Receiver.
[Sender] [Receiver] S.P.D. Sender says many greetings to Receiver.


T. Papirius C. Aurelio sal.

Forgive me if I am mistaken, but I believe that the [Receiver] needs to be in the dative case(-ae for feminine and -o for masculine). And that the [Sender] [Receiver] Sal. is short for [Sender] [Receiver] salutem dicit.

Vale.

Titus Papirius Carbo


Aurelius Papirio sal.

You are perfectly correct amice. This guide is just so people understand what they are seeing when they see this type of phrase in the forums. I know some people who are completely lost at latin terms so I decided to make a simple guide for them to understand what they are reading ^^

Vale!
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Re: Guide to Terms and Abbreviations

Postby Lucius Curtius Philo » Sat Nov 19, 2016 4:11 pm

Salvete!

If anyone writes a detailed article pertaining to Latin greetings and farewells along with other useful terminology regarding Roman names for the forum/email, I will offer denarii compensation.

Such an article should be added to the library; http://romanrepublic.org/bibliotheca/wiki/

Depending on the quality of the work I will offer between 20 and 80 denarii.

This offer expires December 20th.

valete.

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Re: Guide to Terms and Abbreviations

Postby Publius Iunius Brutus » Wed Feb 01, 2017 4:08 am

Brutus CES. sal.

Here are some common Latin abbreviations reported in Latin epigraphy:

Consul - COS., CON., C.
Praetor - PRAET., PR., P.
Censor - CES., CEN., CENS.
Aedile - AED., A.
Curule Aedile - AED CVR., A CVR.
Plebeian Aedile - AED P., AED PL., A P., A PL.
Plebeian Tribune - TR., TRIB., TRIB PL., TRIB P., TR PL., TR P.
Quaestor - Q., QUAEST.
Quaestor Urbanus - Q URB., QUAEST URB.
Quaestor Consularis - Q COS., QUAEST COS.
Quaestor Provincialis - Q P., QUAEST P., Q PROV., QUAEST PROV.
Procurator - PROC.
Proconsul - PROCOS.
Propraetor - PROPR.
Tribunus Laticlavus - TR LATICL.
Senator - SENAT., SEN.
Princeps Senatus - PR. SEN., PRINC SEN., PR SENAT., PRINC SENAT.
Scriba - SCR., SCRIB.
Sacerdos - SAC., SACERD.
Flamen - FL., FLAM., F.
Pontifex - PONT.
Pontifex Maximus - PM., PONT MAX.
Augur - AUGUR.

You can search an epigraphic database to find more here: http://www.trismegistos.org/abb/search.php
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Re: Guide to Terms and Abbreviations

Postby Lucia Horatia Adamas » Wed Feb 01, 2017 11:14 pm



L. Horatia Adamas P. Junio Bruto L. Curtio Philoni C. Aurelio Victori T. Papirio Carboni omnibusque S.P.D.

Just happened upon this interesting topic. Carbo et al. are correct that the receiver's name must go into the dative when this longer, and more formal, greeting is used--but when the names are in the third declension, they will end in -i, not -æ or -o. There are several examples of that above. However, when one uses the simple 'salvé / salvéte' greeting, the name of the person addressed goes into the vocative, not the dative. Fortunately for us English speakers, the Latin vocative is identical with the nominative except in the second declension and a few oddities elsewhere, so feminine names are the same in the vocative as in the nominative, as are several third-declension cognomina for both genders. The only changes are in -us nouns and -ius nouns of the second declension: 'Marcus' becomes 'Marce' in the vocative, and 'Lucius' becomes 'Luci.' Similar names follow the same pattern. 'Deus' is an oddity in that it does not have a separate vocative, and the common adjective 'meus' (= my, mine) has a strange one: 'mi.' Cicero addresses his son as 'mi Cicero.' (note: not 'Marce,' his son's praenomen; the eldest son took the father's praenomen).

Be grateful; Greek has separate vocatives for everything, and so does Sanskrit. Latin is really easy...

Valete!
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